10 Ways to Repurpose Sour Milk

Weeping over spilled milk may be of no use, but we can certainly get irritated when it turns sour! There are few things like despair when food goes bad. We all work really hard for our sustenance, especially if we are taking care of and milking our animals. Luckily, there’s no need to fret: There are many ways to use sour milk so nothing goes to waste.

What is sour milk?

If you’ve ever smelled or tasted sour milk, you’ll remember the experience. Fresh milk has a clean, crisp, sweet taste, especially when you drink it chilled straight from the fridge. Conversely, sour milk tastes like you’ve added vinegar to it. This stuff smells like a gym sock and will leave your mouth covered in gag-worthy bleach if you make the mistake of trying it.

The reason milk is sour is because it has “bloomed” lactobacillus bacteria inside it. Basically, it means that it has reproduced enthusiastically. These bacteria are generally kept in check with either pasteurization or refrigeration. If your fresh milk was left on the counter for too long, especially in hot weather, the high temperature caused bacteria to “ooh la la.”

This strand of bacteria feeds on the lactose in dairy for energy, which it uses when it breeds. The byproduct of its activity is lactic acid, which gives sour milk its pungent (sour) taste. This is the same lactic acid that is made by cabbage when it is fermented into sauerkraut or kimchi.

If lactic acid is allowed to precipitate, it converts the milk protein casein into curd. Hence the “curd” milk. And what is yogurt? cheese!

Sour milk by itself is not tasty, but they are generally safe to use. Below are some of the main things you can do with your sour milk in addition to pouring it in the sink.

1. Bake With It!

Many dishes, especially breads, various pancakes and waffles, specifically call for “sour milk” or sometimes buttermilk. This usually involves adding a teaspoon of lemon juice or vinegar to slightly ferment the milk. Obviously, this creates a kind of fermentation that helps leaven the other ingredients and extends shelf life. Isn’t that good?

If you wake up to a container of sour milk, consider a surprise pancake or waffle meal. Not only will you put all that dairy goodness to excellent use, some family members will complain about a pile of waffles for breakfast.
or dinner.

You can also use that sour milk to make sourdough bread and biscuits.

2. Make Some Cheese

Cheese is basically milk that has been “turned off”. As a result, using sour milk to make cheese makes the process a little faster. Cottage cheese, ricotta and cream cheese are the easiest to make, although you can make a variety of different types depending on what ingredients you have on hand.

If you haven’t tried making homemade paneer yet, this is the perfect opportunity to try doing so. It’s a lot easier than you think, and you already have a lot of major ingredients. A basic ponytail is probably the easiest and most versatile. You can eat it as is, use it in lasagna, or compress it into cheese.

3. Add it to sauces, soups, casseroles etc.

If you love creamy savory dishes, use that sour milk in some of your favorite recipes. For example, scalloped potatoes get an extra kick from it, and sour milk also works well in dishes like clam chowder, broccoli soup, and various casseroles.

The best way to use this type of milk to thicken dishes like this is in a roux. Whisk together equal parts butter and flour in a small saucepan over medium heat, whisking regularly to form a paste. Then reduce the heat and add sour milk little by little while stirring all the time. You should get a kind of thick cream.

Use a spatula to add it to soups or to mix it directly into your pasta or casseroles.

4. Make Salad Dressing

Do you enjoy creamy, slightly tangy salad dressings like Caesar or Ranch? Guess what’s perfect as the base for these beauties? Pulse the sour milk in a blender with a little sour cream or yogurt, a tablespoon mayonnaise, and spices such as fresh parsley, chives, dill, salt, pepper, and garlic powder.

Adjust the ratio depending on whether you’re aiming for a thinner dressing, or a thicker dipping sauce. Season to taste, and enjoy!

5. Use Sour Milk to Marinate Chicken

Have you ever eaten chicken marinated in buttermilk? It is amazingly tender and juicy. This is because the milk acid in buttermilk tenderizes the meat, and allows it to retain moisture more easily. The acidity in sour milk produces a similar effect.

To use it for chicken, prepare the meat in a bowl and pour sour milk over it. Be sure to coat it well, then cover the bowl and refrigerate it for at least 12 hours.

6. Soak the Grains in Ita

Some holistic nutritionists recommend that people soak grains in cultured or fermented dairy. It helps break down the fibrous coatings on grains, which are loaded with inflammatory “anti-nutrients.” These include lectins (which are harmful to people with autoimmune conditions), enzyme inhibitors, and phytic acid.

Soaking the cereal in sour milk or kefir makes the cereal a little pre-digested. This makes it far easier for the human body to break them down and absorb their beneficial nutrients.

If you want to try it, soak your cereal for at least eight hours before using it to cook or bake. This gives the phytic acid time to break down.

7. Polish Your Silverware

Do you have silver items that have become tarnished? Good News! The same mild acid that will tenderize your chicken will wash away the tarnish from real silverware. Just put these things in a shallow pan and cover everything with sour milk. Cover it with some plastic wrap, and let it sit on the counter for about an hour.

Then wash it in soapy water, wash and wipe dry with a clean cloth. It should be amazingly shiny and shiny! Just make sure that you throw away the soaked milk so that no one gets sick.

8. Add It to Your Next Bath

Have you ever taken a milk bath before? It can help soften and smooth your skin, and may also provide some anti-inflammatory benefits. For example, a milk bath can reduce the discomfort and itching associated with chicken pox, poison ivy and sunburn.

Simply add milk to your next bath, and soak in it for 15 minutes for maximum benefits. Simply avoid using sugar scrubs with milk, as you could end up with less-than-comfortable skin (or internal) conditions.

9. Give Your Livestock a Treat

Both pigs and hens can benefit from adding a little sour milk to their diet. Since dairy is very high in protein and calcium, it will act like a supplement for your chickens. Sour milk is especially high in riboflavin – as is yogurt – which results in better egg development. This will thicken the chickens a bit more, which is great if you’re raising meat birds.

10. Feed Your Plants

Many plants actually benefit from milk and other dairy products. As an example, I had a lot of trouble with my pumpkins a few years ago, as they suffered horribly from rotting at the end of the blooms. This is due to the lack of calcium during flowering. As a result, the next time I grew them I watered them and fed them. This resulted in a lot of healthy, happy pumpkins (and lots of pies and soups for my family).

Pour sour milk into the water in the ratio 1:2 of milk and water. Then offer this drink to your fruiting plants at soil level. your Cucurbitaceae Plants (such as pumpkins, squash, melons, and couscous) will appreciate the extra nutrients, as will various solace (nightshade) species such as tomato and eggplant.

Remember: sour milk is No curd like milk

As a final note, when we talk about sour milk here, we are only talking about milk that has a slightly sour taste, but is fine nonetheless. If it is green in color and it is dry and sticky, then it is not really good to use. Not even as animal feed.

If your milk has gone bad enough for you to see it, just add it to your compost pile. You may be tempted by the idea that it sounds wasteful, but it will add its nutrients to the soil being built there.

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Idea Source: morningchores.com

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