24 Pretty Pink Plants That Add a Pop

Plants have become a design staple in most homes in recent years as they give you a touch of welcome green, are unique, filter the air, and allow you to have a living piece of decor. But, if you’re trying to grow plants that are different from most others, take a look at pink plants.

These vibrant and bold options are usually cultivars of plants you love and know, like prayer plants or philodendron, but they have the colorful, bonus twist of being stunning pink. We’ll outline 24 pretty pink plants that pop below and go over some lore associated with them.

1 Pink Water Lily

Pink Plant Meanings & Symbolism

The meaning behind your pink plant depends on the cultural traditions around it and the exact species you have. Many plants, especially pink-hued ones, have links to romance, happiness, and good luck. Some people have pink plants in their homes to bring in a positive, pure, bright vibe. With this bold color, the positive meanings aren’t a big surprise.

If you take a look at the unspoken flower language, you’ll find that people use pink plants to convey different messages. They’ve been used since Victorian times and an ancient Asian civilizations, and a few of the most popular pink plant meanings include:

  • Blush Pink Hyacinth – They represent happiness and playfulness.
  • Delicate Pink Orchids – Orchids typically embody feminine grace, beauty, and femininity.
  • Hot Pink Tulips – They stand for life in general and a passion for living it.
  • Pink Camellias – This plant is a charming way to tell someone how much you miss them.
  • Pink Carnation – This is a very subtle way for you to tell someone you’ll never forget them.
  • Pink Cherry Blossoms – As the original clue that spring is here, they also stand for the cycle of life and freshness.
  • Pink Chrysanthemums – In spite of the fact that this pink plant is very cheerful, they’re strongly associated with funerals in some Asian cultures.
  • Pink Lotus Flower – Lotus flowers represent Buddha’s historical legends.
  • Pink Roses – Generally speaking, pink roses mean admiration, sweetness, love, and adoration.

2 Pink Tulip

Pink Plant History and Significance

In the color spectrum, pink wasn’t officially a color name until the 1700s. Originally, pink was assigned to a flowering plant species called Dianthus plumarius. Through culture, art, literature, and science, the color pink’s cultural identification and significance has evolved  a lot over the past 300-odd years.

Pink’s First Time Taking Center Stage

Unlike purple and red that are colors with very long histories, pink didn’t get popular until the Rococo Period. During the later portion of the 17th century, artists started incorporating brighter colors, and this is when pink came into fashion. Pink gained massive popularity due largely to Madame de Pompadour. She had a love for pink-hued clothing and dishes that made it a very popular choice across Europe and France. However, at this time, pink was the color that symbolizes luxury instead of femininity.

Pink’s Masculine Origins During the 1800s

Pink wasn’t associated with being feminine until the middle of the 19th century. Before this time, pink was a very genderless color like yellow or soft green tends to be today. It was even masculine. Red has historically played a very masculine role when it comes to the language of colors. This is due to the fact that red has ties to celestial objects like Mars or warfare, and pink got lumped into the same category as it’s just a lighter shade of red.

You may not believe it, but pink was often recommended as a color for boys in department store catalogs until well into the mid-century.  At this time, blue was the color of femininity and virginity, so it was more female-recommended.

Pink and Ties to the LGBTQIA+

Today, pink is a color that is a very prominent cultural symbol with the LGBTQIA+ communities. This comes from the horrors or the Nazi concentration capms where they used a pink triangle to designate the prisoner’s sexual preferences. Decades after World War II, this fact came to light and gay activisits siezed on it. They turned the color into a color of pride, and it’s a homage to the people who were treated so cruelly in Europe and the United States.

Pink in Eastern Culture

However, Eastern culture tells a different story with the color pink. Pink is a very popular men’s color in India. You’ll find it used for wedding outfits and in ritual turbans called safas. Japan also sees pink as a masculine color, and it has ties to slain samurai. Many people believe the pink plants and flowers signify good health in Japan. In Thailand, pink plants mean trust, and they mean good fortune in China.

25 Pretty Pink Plants That Pop

There are a huge range of pink plants and flowers available that it can be difficult to narrow down which ones are best for your planting zone. We’ve picked out 24 relatively easy options to consider below.

1. Aechmea Bromeliad (Aechmea spp.)

This bromeliad group references several plants that have pink flowers that set inside spike-shaped leaves in a cup shape. In the wild, they tend to grow on top of tree branches in the rainforest canopy, so their unique look makes sense.

  • Feeding – Spray your pink plant with a diluted fertilizer for houseplants once a month.
  • Growth – Slowly but will get up to two feet tall and wide
  • Light – Indirect, medium light
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 80°F with higher humidity levels
  • Watering – When the top two inches of soil dry out, water thoroughly

3 Aechmea Bromeliad

2. Aglaonema (Atglaonema genus)

Also called the Chinese Evergreen, this pink plant actually has deep green leaves with pink speckles, veins, or patches. There are dozens of Aglaonema available to buy, so you can choose from a range of pink patterns and hues.

  • Feeding – Fertilize once a month during the active growing season using a general houseplant fertilizer
  • General Care – Very easy and great for beginning gardeners
  • Growth – Tops out at three feet tall
  • Light – Can handle bright, indirect or dim lighting, and it isn’t picky on how much light it gets each day
  • Temperature and Humidity – 50°F to 80°F with lower to medium humidity levels
  • Watering – Water when the top inch of soil dries out, roughly each week during the spring and summer months with a well-draining, lightweight potting soil

4 Aglaonema

3. Anthurium Tickled Pink (Anthurium spp.)

This pink plant comes with a very bright shade of pink on ‘flowers’ that are actually modified leaves. The rest of the leaves are those deep green, classic, waxy Anthurium ones. Each bloom will last for eight weeks, and it’s rare to find this pink plant without flowers on it all year-round.

  • Feeding – Fertilize them once a month during the spring and summer months with a diluted, half-strength liquid fertilizer.
  • General Care – Very easy
  • Growth – 12 inches wide and 12 to 18 inches tall
  • Light – Indirect, bright light with more light equaling more flowers
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 80°F with higher humidity levels
  • Watering – Water when the top quarter portion of the soil dries out

5 Anthurium Tickled Pink

4. Arrowhead Plant (Syngonium podophyllum)

As the name suggests, the Arrowhead Plant comes with leaves shaped like arrowheads. They can be white, green, or pink, and it’s a great pink plant to have in a space with a lot of light.

  • Feeding – Feed once a month using houseplant fertilizer during the spring and summer months
  • General Care – Very easy
  • Growth – Up to 18 inches tall
  • Light – Low to bright indirect lighting
  • Temperature and Humidity – 65°F to 80°F with higher humidity
  • Watering – Water your pink plant when the top inch of soil dries out

6 Arrowhead Plant

5. Calathea Triostar (Stromanthe thalia)

This prayer plant relative comes with long white and green leaves that feature pink undersides. At night, the leaves fold up like hands praying, hence the links to the prayer plant. These are gorgeous plants, but they’re very finicky to take care of, so beginners will have trouble keeping it alive.

  • Feeding – Fertilize your pink plant once a month during spring and early summer using a general houseplant fertilizer at quarter strength
  • General Care – Challenging as the plant is very finicky
  • Growth – 18 inches wide and 24 inches tall
  • Light – Indirect, medium lighting
  • Temperature and Humidity – 65°F to 80°F with higher humidity
  • Watering – When the top inch or two of soil dries out, water it with distilled water

7 Calathea Triostar
Calathea Triostar by Leonora (Ellie) Enking / CC BY-SA 2.0

6. Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera bridgesii)

This pretty trailing cactus will give you bright pink flowers, and most of the blooms come in winter, right around the winter season. If you care for it correctly, the Christmas Cactus can easily live for 100 years, and it’s great for beginner gardeners.

  • Feeding – Feed your cactus with a diluted fertilizer with high potassium every two to four weeks
  • Growth – Leaves can easily trail over two feet from the main plant
  • Light – Bright to medium, indirect light
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 80°F with medium levels
  • Watering – When the top two inches of soil are dry, water thoroughly

8 Christmas Cactus

7. Coleus (Coleus spp.)

Coleus are pink plants that have leaves that come in virtually every pattern or color you can think of. They’re easy to grow outside or indoors, and they’re very easy to propagate using stem cuttings.

  • Feeding – During the springtime, add a nitrogen-rich fertilizer one time
  • Growth – Up to three feet tall, but dependant on the variety
  • Light – Indirect, medium light
  • Temperature and Humidity – 55°F to 80°F with medium or high humidity
  • Watering – Don’t allow the soil to completely dry out, and water when the first inch of soil dries out

9 Coleus

8. Cordyline ‘Pink Passion’ (Cordyline australis)

Better known as the cabbage tree, this pink plant adds a very dramatic look with sword-like, long, colorful leaves in your space. It’s a New Zealand native, and it can get to an impressive 20 feet tall. However, this particular cultivar has been bred to stay much smaller.

  • Feeding – Feed it every four weeks during the spring and summer with a houseplant fertilizer
  • Growth – Six feet tall inside
  • Light – Bright, indirect light for a minimum of six hours a day
  • Temperature and Humidity – 50°F to 80°F with low or medium humidity
  • Watering – During spring and summer, water very thoroughly once a week

10 Cordyline Pink Passion

9. Dracaena Marginata (Dracaena marginata)

Most of the leaves on the Dragon Tree are green, but it does have reddish-pink edges. These pink plants are native to Madagascar, and they can easily reach 20 feet tall. However, they tend to stay much more compact indoors.

  • Feeding – Feed your plant with a diluted houseplant fertilizer once a month during spring and summer
  • Growth – Up to six feet tall indoors
  • Light – Indirect but bright
  • Temperature and Humidity – 65°F to 85°F with  medium or high humidity levels
  • Watering – Water when the top two inches of soil dry out

11 Dracaena Marginata
Dracaena Marginata by Forest and Kim Starr / CC BY 2.0

10. Earth Star ( -Crypatanthus spp.)

Earth Stars are another group of plants that fall into the bromeliad family. They tend to develop brightly-colored rosettes and always be slow-growing. They come in a host of patterns and colors, so do your research before you pick out this pink plant.

  • Feeding – Fertilize the plant twice during the spring with standard fertilizer
  • Growth – Up to six inches tall and two feet wide
  • Light – Indirect, bright light with brighter light helping to develop color
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 85°F with medium or high humidity
  • Watering – Water the soil instead of the plant when the top two inches of soil dries out

12 Earth Star

11. Echeveria ‘Perle von Nurnberg’ (Echeveria gibbiflora ‘Metallica’ × E. elegans)

Like many succulent types, Echeveria is a pink plant that’ll turn this shade when it gets a larger amount of light. Otherwise, it has a grayish-blue color. Alfred Graser is a German plant breeder who developed it.

  • Feeding – Give it a succulent fertilizer every two months during the active growing season
  • Growth – UP to six inches wide and tall
  • Light – Bright indirect or direct sunlight
  • Temperature and Humidity – 50°F to 80°F with low to medium humidity levels
  • Watering – Water when the top half of the soil dries out, and it can tolerate short droughts

13 Echeveria Perle von Nurnberg

12. Fittonia ‘Pink Forest Flame’ (Fittonia albivenis)

Also called the mosaic or nerve plant, this pink plant has green leaves that are covered in pink veins. This is a tropical plant that can’t stand drying out, and it will put on a dramatic wilting effect to let you know it needs water. It makes a wonderful terrarium plant.

  • Feeding – Feed your plant every two to four weeks during spring and summer using half-strength fertilizer
  • General Care – Easy as long as you don’t forget the water
  • Growth – 12 to 18 inches wide and three to six inches tall
  • Light – Indirect light as bright light can scorch or burn it
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 80°F with higher humidity
  • Watering – Water it regularly, especially if you see it start to wilt

14 Fittonia Pink Forest Flame

13. Kalanchoe fedtschenkoi ‘Variegata’ (Bryophyllum fedtschenkoi)

This is a taller succulent that offers lavender or green leaves with pink, scalloped edges. The more light this plant gets, the more you’ll see a pink plant.

  • Feeding – During spring and summer, feed it once a month
  • Light – Bright indirect or direct light
  • Temperature and Humidity – 50°F to 80°F with low or medium humidity levels
  • Watering – Water when the top quarter soil dries out

15 Kalanchoe fedtschenkoi

14. Kalanchoe ‘Pink Butterflies’ (Kalanchoe x houghtonii)

This cultivar is a show-stopping succulent that produces hundreds of pink plantlets that sit on top of green leaves. This pink plant is very similar to mother-of-thousand type plants that can easily root to form more plants. Generally speaking, the plantlets on this cultivar won’t form roots.

  • Feeding – Fertilize once a month during the spring and summer months with half-strength fertilizer
  • General Care – Medium because of environmental requirements
  • Growth – Up to 12 inches tall with a slow growth habit
  • Light – Direct, bright light – and these plants need lots of it
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 85°F with low or medium humidity
  • Watering – Water when the top half of your well-draining potting mix dries out

16 Kalanchoe Pink Butterflies

15. Mosaic Plant (Ludwigia sedioides)

If you’re after a pink plant for your aquatic garden or fish tank, take a look at this pick. The Mosaic Plant is an aquatic cultivar that offers clusters of pink, green, and red leaves that will float on the surface of the water.

  • Feeding – A few times during the summer, add an aquatic plant fertilizer
  • Growth – No growth limit and will spread up to a foot per month
  • Light – A minimum of eight hours of direct, bright light per day
  • Temperature and Humidity – Water that is between 72° and 80°F
  • Watering – pH has to be between six and eight

17 Mosaic Plant

16. Pink Calla Lily Plant (Zantedeschia spp.)

Calla lilies are known for the funnel-shaped, elegant blooms that florists use in bouquets a lot. Due to their links to the goddesses Venus and Hera, Calla Lilies usually have a romantic appeal to them.

  • Feeding – Add fertilizer in the spring to encourage blooms
  • Growth – Two feet wide and tall
  • Light – Part shade or bright light
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 80°F with medium or high humidity
  • Watering – Water when the top two inches of soil dries out

18 Pink Calla Lily

17. Pink Congo (Philodendron spp.)

This philodendron was developed to try and compete with the pink plant called the Pink Princess Philodendron that we’ll touch on next. It has pink leaves that come from an application of plant hormones, and the pink color fades within a year.

  • Feeding – Fertilize using a houseplant fertilizer once a month during spring and summer
  • Growth – 12 to 18 inches tall
  • Light – Bright to medium indirect light
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 85°F with low or medium humidity
  • Watering – Water once a week during the active growing season when the two one or two inches of soil dries out

19 Pink Congo

18. Pink Princess Philodendron (Philodendron erubescens)

Many plant lovers have this pink plant on their wish lists for a reason. The Pink Princess Philodendron features mature leaves that are an extremely dark green with deep pink splotches. The pink splotches are actually a genetic variation, so not all plants will be pink when you get it.

  • Feeding – In the spring a summer, add a diluted fertilizer once a month
  • Growth – Three to four feet with a fast growth habit
  • Light – Indirect but bright
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 85°F with medium to higher humidity
  • Watering – Water when the top inch of soil dries out

20 Pink Princess Philodendron
Pink Princess Philodendron by Laura Blanchard / CC BY-SA 2.0

19. Polka Dot Plant (Hypoestes phyllostachya)

This cute pink plant comes from Madagascar, and they’re very popular. They feature pink leaves that are dotted with green spots, and this is where the plant’s name comes from.

  • Feeding – During spring and summer, fertilize once a month using houseplant fertilizer
  • Growth – Up to a foot wide and two feet tall
  • Light – Indirect, low to medium lighting
  • Temperature and Humidity – 65°F to 80°F with medium or high humidity

21 Polka Dot Plant

20. Rex Begonia (Begonia rex-cultorum)

Many people like to grow begonias for their flowers, but not Rex Begonia. Instead, the foliage on this pink plant is showy enough. There are several cultivars with various leaf patterns and colors available.

  • Feeding – Each month, feed it a diluted houseplant fertilizer
  • Growth – Up to 12 inches tall, but depends on the plant
  • Light – Bright to medium indirect lighting
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 80°F with medium humidity levels
  • Watering – Water it when the top inch of soil dries out

22 Rex Begonia

21. Snow White Waffle Plant (Hemigraphis alternata)

Better known as the purple waffle plant, this pink plant has foliage with a wavy appearance and a metallic tint to it. If the plant looks faded, you can move it to a spot with more light to encourage it to do well.

  • Feeding – During spring and summer, fertilize it with a houseplant fertilizer once a month
  • Growth – 24 inches wide and six to eight inches tall
  • Light – Indirect, bright light ensures good coloring
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 85°F with medium or high humidity
  • Watering – Water roughly every four to seven days during spring and summer, or when the top inch of soil dries out

23 Snow White Waffle Plant
Snow White Waffle Plant by Clint Budd / CC BY 2.0

22. Stromanthe sanguinea (Stromanthe sanguinea)

This pink plant comes with pretty foliage with green and cream sections with hot pink undersides. It grows on the forest floor, and it’s native to Brazil.

  • Feeding – Feed once a month with a diluted houseplant fertilizer
  • General Care – Challenging and difficult
  • Growth – Two feet wide and three feet tall
  • Light – Indirect, bright light
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 80°F with higher humidity
  • Watering – When the top inch of soil dries out, water thoroughly

24 Stromanthe sanguinea
Stromanthe sanguinea by 阿橋 HQ / CC BY-SA 2.0

23. Tradescantia Nanouk (Tradescantia albiflora)

This pink plant showcases a pretty trailing habit with stunning pink, green, and white stripes. Plant breeders in the Netherlands first developed it, but the genus is actually native to South and Central America. You may hear it referred to as Fantasy Venice.

  • General Care – Easy, fantastic for new gardeners
  • Growth – Trails up to 24 inches with a four to six inch height
  • Light – Indirect but bright
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60° to 85°F with high or medium humidity
  • Watering – Water once a week during the active growing season or when the top inch of soil dries out and once every few weeks during winter

25 Tradescantia Nanouk
Tradescantia Nanouk by Plantician Guy / CC BY 2.0

24. Tri-Color Oyster Plant (Tradescantia spathacea)

The Tri-Color Oyster Plant is more commonly called Moses in the Cradle, and it features long green and cream leaves with purple on the undersides. It’s very good for beginners as it’s not finicky.

  • Feeding – Fertilize once a month using houseplant fertilizer at half strength
  • Growth – Up to a foot wide and tall
  • Light – Bright to medium but indirect
  • Temperature and Humidity – 60°F to 85°F with low or high humidity levels
  • Watering – Water when the top inch of soil dries out

26 Tri Color Oyster Plant
Tri-Color Oyster Plant by Kelly Hunter / CC BY 2.0

Bottom Line

These 24 pink plants can add pops of color and cheerfulness to any area, and most of them are easy enough for new gardeners to try out. Most of them are meant for inside growth, but there are a few you can plant outside and enjoy the bright pink hue all spring and summer long.

Pink Plants 1 Pink Plants 2

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