61 Free DIY Chicken Coop Plans and Ideas That Are Easy to Build

Chicken Coop Plans

Table of Contents

If you stumbled upon this article, there’s a high chance that you’re new to raising chickens and looking to build a chicken coop by yourself. Not buying a pre-fabricated one.

That’s great. For most people with basic woodworking skill, building a chicken coop isn’t really that hard.

You just need a detailed plan to build one.

This is extremely important especially if you don’t have any experience in building something like this before.

There are a lot of free chicken coop plans on the internet. In fact, BackyardChicken alone (one of the biggest online chicken owner communities) has more than 3,000 of them, submitted by the members.

But, the problem is, not all of them are good enough to follow.

While I’m browsing the collection a few weeks ago, among those 3,000 ideas only 10% of them are realistically can be built by beginners. Most of them are either too hard to build or don’t have detailed plans.

That’s why I created this article.

I gathered 61 of the best-looking, easiest-to-build, or the cheapest chicken coop plan available so YOU too can build it by yourself.

How to Build the Right Chicken Coop

Before we start to the free plans, it’s important to know what makes a good chicken coop. A coop isn’t just a shelter, it’s a house where your chickens live. Just like a human’s house, the happiness and healthiness of your chickens highly influenced by the coop.

That’s why it’s important to know these things before you build one.

I’ll keep it short, but if you want to skip to the first free plan, click the button:

 

1. Decide the size of your coop

As a general rule of thumb, one chicken needs 3-4 square feet of space of coop. So if you’re planning to have 3, then you’ll need 12 square foot coop (3×4, 6×2, or bigger).

However, if you plan to coop them all the time, you need at least 10 feet each.

If the space is too small, your chickens will not be happy. The coop will get smelly real fast, your chicken will be stressed out, they will start pecking each other, they will get sick, and eventually, die.

You can technically provide less than 3 square feet per chicken, BUT they must be outdoors most of the time.

For smaller bantam breeds, you’ll only need 2 square feet instead of 4.

2. Decide the location

Consider these when choosing the location for your chicken coop:

  1. Sunshine and shade – your flock needs natural sunlight, but not all day
  2. Wind – a nice flow of air is good, but avoid places exposed to strong wind. Under a tree is often a good place for reason number 1 and 2
  3. Ease of access – you’ll need to check the coop 2 times per day or more, make sure it’s easily accessible for human
  4. Smell and noise – don’t place the coop too close to your house, or your neighbor’s

Pro tip: Don’t decide a location right away, monitor the area for at least one week to make sure there’s no major problem.

3. Plan the coop

Your coop isn’t just a wall and roof to protect your chickens, there are things on the inside (and outside) to keep your chickens alive and healthy. Here are a few important things to plan.

Must-haves:

  1. Nesting box – this is where your hens will lay their eggs. You need to have at least 1 box per 2 hens with the size of 12x12x12 inches and about 10-20 inches above the ground
  2. Windows/ventilation – your chicken will get sick easily if there’s no light and proper ventilation
  3. Feeder and waterer – for obvious reasons

Nice-to-haves:

  1. Perch area – chickens love to sleep on perch
  2. The run – in the addition to the shelter, an outdoor fenced area is important to keep your chickens happy
  3. Dust bath box – chickens need to clean themselves with dust to stay healthy
  4. Poop boards – place it below the perching area, it’ll save you a lot of time cleaning the coop
  5. Lighting – in the winter, warm lights can boost egg production

That’s the basic, but not everything. I can’t go too in-depth in this article, otherwise, the whole page would become too long.

And that’s all you need to know…now you’re ready to build a chicken coop.

61 Free Chicken Coop Plans:

Capacity for Chickens:

1-4   5-10   11-20   >20

Difficulty to Build:

Easy Intermediate   Hard

1. Urban Chicken Coop

This raised chicken coop is perfect if you don’t have a big area or if you’re not raising too many chickens in your flock. You can see by the image that while it’s beautiful, it seems really easy to build. Well, it is! The best thing about this one is that Lynda included well-designed infographics on how to build the coop.

Dimensions (feet)6 x 3
Ideal Capacity5 chickens
(1 chicken needs 3-4 square feet of space)
DifficultyEasy

 

2. Natalie’s Chicken Coop Plan

If I were to rank this coop based on the details, this would be one of the top-ranked. While this is not the easiest to build, Natalie wrote every single material needed to build this coop. Along with a nice 3D image from SketchUp. It’s not the easiest, but you won’t have any problem building it as long as you downloaded the PDF file from her blog.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 3.5
Ideal Capacity7 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

3. The Palace Chicken Coop

In addition to the coop itself, it has a run large enough so each chicken will get around 10 sqft area. Just by looking at the image, you can know that “The Palace” is sturdy. It looks so professional it makes you wonder if you can build it yourself. Don’t worry, even Jaden and Scott who aren’t architects can design and build it by themselves.

Dimensions (feet)6 x 4 for the shelter
Ideal Capacity6 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

4. The South City Coop

You won’t believe if I say this is Rick’s first ever major building project, but it is. If Rick can build this, you can too. South City Coop is ideal if you don’t want your coop and run to take much space because the shape is long to the side and not wide to the front. Lastly, it has so many windows and ventilation so you don’t have to worry about lighting and air circulation.

Dimensions (feet)6 x 3
Ideal Capacity5 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

5. Free Chicken Coop Plan by BarnGeek

The guys at BarnGeek said that this exact chicken coop is being sold for $2,000, but they managed to build it for free with leftover lumbers from another project. The biggest plus of this plan is the ease of access, you can gather eggs, feed, and water your chickens without hassle.

Dimensions (feet)6 x 4
Ideal Capacity6 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

6.Trictle’s Chicken Coop

Look at that cute little chicken house. You don’t have to worry of your flock getting cold in the winter, you don’t have to give it additional heater, this coop will give your chickens enough heat by itself. By the way, it’s raised from the ground. That means extra protection from predators, safe from flooding, and cooler on the summer.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 4
Ideal Capacity4 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

7. 7 Free Plans by Backyard Farming

Not one, not two, but seven. 4 plans for the coop from small, medium, to large. 1 automatic waterer, 1 feeder, and 1 nest boxes plans. I don’t exactly know how but Angela from Backyard Farming said that these plans are provided by universities (University of Tennessee and North Dakota Agricultural College) so I won’t have any doubt for the structures.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 6 to 11 x 12
Ideal Capacity17 to 33 chickens
DifficultyEasy to Intermediate

 

8. My6Chick’s Chicken Coop

It has removable roosts, door sweep, electricity for heated water feeder, lights, IR Chick-cam, and good ventilation. Basically, everything you need (and want) in a coop. This chicken coop can be attached to a run, although the plan for the run itself is not included here.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 4
Ideal Capacity8 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

9. Pallet Palace Chicken Coop

Pallets are like treasures for homesteaders, it’s often free and you can build anything with it. If you can get pallets easily (which it is) then you might be able to build this coop for almost $0, no cost (other than the optional paint job). The size of Pallet Palace is rather big, but you can easily adjust it by the number of pallets if you don’t have too many chickens.

Dimensions (feet)16 x 8
Ideal Capacity32 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

10. Easy Chicken Coop

The name doesn’t lie, it does look easy. The guys at MyOutdoorPlans said that you can build this coop in just one day even if you haven’t built anything before. By the way, they have a plan for nesting box too.

Dimensions (feet)6 x 4
Ideal Capacity6 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

11. Judy’s Free Pallet Chicken Coop

Another chicken coop made of pallets that you can possibly build for free. Judy said that she saved about $1,000 in lumbers by using pallets. The difference between Judy’s plan and Pallet Palace is that Judy disassembled it first before using the pallet for materials. Extra work, but the result is better than if you don’t disassemble it.

Dimensions (feet)7 x 7
Ideal Capacity12 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

12. BuildEazy Chicken Coop

BuildEazy is a website that gives people free woodworking plans. They have hundreds of free plans available. If you want, you can buy the plans for just $5 to download the printable files. Anyway, in this chicken coop plan, they explained step by step from the material list, floor elevation plan, up to installing the roof. Perfect for a beginner who doesn’t have any idea where they should begin.

Dimensions (feet)6 x 6
Ideal Capacity9 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

13.Wire Spools Chicken Coop

This one has a unique shape…but not only that. While it’s not the most beautiful-looking coop, it’s free to build (well, almost) and it doesn’t take much space. I mean, look at the image, it’s vertical unlike the other plans in this article. One thing, though. This coop is originally made for bantam breeds. However, if you want to, you can make it a little bit wider. And you shouldn’t keep the chickens inside for the whole day.

Dimensions (feet)N/A
Ideal Capacity2 chickens (bantam)
DifficultyEasy

 

14. Chicken Coop Plans by Home Depot

There’s no way you don’t know who Home Depot is, they’re the pros when in comes to home improvement. In this chicken coop plan, they listed every material needed and how to buy them (from their own store, obviously). They even made a two part videos just so you can understand it better.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 3
Ideal Capacity3 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

15. Farmer Kitty’s Coop

If you want a chicken coop that can literally be built in a few hours, this one’s for you. The owner of this coop, Farmer Kitty (it’s his/her username on BYC), is raising chickens but only for a few months in a year. That’s why she/he built this super simple chicken coop because building a complicated and expensive one would be a waste.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 4
Ideal Capacity8 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

16. Shed Chicken Coop

Ana created this chicken coop plan for his friend, Whitney, who managed to build it in 30 hours in 4 days with only 3 people working on it. In this post, Ana listed every tool, material (and the size), and the 3D SketchUp pictures that you’ll need to build the coop.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 4
Ideal Capacity8 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

17. Permanent Hoop Coop

It uses curvy roofing not only to look good, there are 3 benefits on using them. First, heat transmission. Curved roof is getting more direct sun rays compared to a flat roof, so your coop will be warmer in the winter. Second, it’s significantly sturdier, especially when it comes to strong winds. And third, it’s much easier to build, lay the foundation, install the roof, and you’re done.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 8 for the shelter
8 x 16 in total
Ideal Capacity16 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

18. PVC Chicken Coop

Think about it, PVC is inexpensive, durable, and easy to assemble. It’s a perfect alternative to woods as material for chicken coop structures. You don’t have to cut or nail anything if you’re building a coop with this plan. When you’ve downloaded the PDF files from this site (there are 3 designs) you’ll realize that it’s really easy to build.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 4 for the shelter
10 x 9 in total
Ideal Capacity4 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

19. Harriet’s House

A guy named Karl Caden have more than 100 of chicken coop plans for sale in different styles and sizes, but he’s giving you this one for free as a sample. Don’t get it wrong, just because it’s free doesn’t mean it’s bad…it’s really good. Give it a try, maybe you’ll be interested in his other designs too.

Dimensions (feet)12 x 3
Ideal Capacity9 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

20. Kevin’s Chicken Tractor

If you don’t know yet, a chicken tractor is basically a portable chicken coop that can be moved easily around your yard. Why build a portable instead of permanent coop? There are 2 reasons for this. The first one is because chickens are good for your garden, they produce natural fertilizer, and they eat pests and weeds. Second, if they stay too long on one place, that area will become smelly.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 4 in total
Ideal Capacity4 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

21. The Kerr Center Chicken Tractor

Another chicken tractor plan, this time from The Kerr Center. It’s bigger than the previous one and the shelter is raised from the ground. Although this is a portable tractor, you can also use it as a permanent coop.

Dimensions (feet)5 x 2.5 for the shelter
10 x 5 in total
Ideal Capacity3 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

22. Robb’s Backyard Chicken Coop

One of the most popular chicken coop plans in Instructables with over 500 favorites and 700,000 views. Robb said the design was inspired by some barns in Kansas. It looks really easy to build and only costs about $40. By the way, Robb shared some of his knowledge about chicken and coop on this page, make sure to read it even if you’re not interested in the design.

Dimensions (feet)6 x 4
Ideal Capacity6 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

23. Melissa’s DIY Chicken Coop

Judging by the design alone, this may not the best out of all I’ve listed above. But this one is the true DIY. Melissa — who didn’t have any experience in constructions at all — builds (almost) all of this by herself, his husband only helped her with the roof. Anyway, I can’t include the picture but there’s actually a hinge on the roof. It can be opened like a door so you can clean the inside easily.

Dimensions (feet)3.5 x 3.5
Ideal Capacity3 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

24. Large Chicken Coop Design

The overall dimensions are 8×12, with 4×8 for the shelter. This is perfect if you want to raise more than 10 heavy layers without them getting cramped. I can imagine if I were a chicken, I’d be happy to live here for the rest of my life.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 4 for the shelter
12 x 8 in total
Ideal Capacity8 chickens
DifficultyHard

 

25. Simplistic Chicken Coop

For people who are serious about raising chickens, they’ll have no problem building large, complicated, expensive coop. But what if you just want to raise 2 or 3 just to save a little money on eggs and meats? Building those large coops would be a huge waste. This Simplistic Chicken Coop is for you. It requires very little money, time, and skill to build, but it’s strong and weather-proof.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 2
Ideal Capacity4 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

26. The Feather Factory Chicken Coop

It’s large, it’s beautiful, it’s secure, it has proper ventilation. It may be a little expensive but if you build this coop, you won’t have to build another one for years so it worth the investment. You may want to increase or decrease the size, but the creator of this plan has already optimized it so there will be no waste (in material and money).

Dimensions (feet)4 x 5 for the shelter
10 x 5 in total
Ideal Capacity5 chickens
DifficultyHard

 

27. Small Chicken House

The title says small, but it’s a ‘house’…so it’s actually bigger than most I’ve listed on this page. Consider building this house if you’re planning to keep your chickens mostly indoor. This coop has a big space and ventilation so it’s okay as long as you don’t put too many chickens in it. (but still, I don’t recommend you to keep them indoor all the time)

Dimensions (feet)8 x 8
Ideal Capacity16 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

28. Downeast Thunder Farm Chicken Coop

Personally, if I were to choose one, this might be the one I’d build. The design isn’t too simple, but not unnecessarily complicated. On top of that, I prefer a wide rectangle coop instead of square because it’s more efficient. The chickens will spend most of their time outside anyway.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 4 for the coop
8 x 12 for the run
Ideal Capacity8 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

29. A-Frame Chicken Coop

Another chicken coop plans by Ana White. This time, it’s a portable chicken tractor. For a chicken tractor, this design is the most efficient in weight-space ratio. Your chickens still have comfortable vertical space, yet it’s not too heavy to lift and move.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 5
The shelter on the top is 10 sqft
Ideal Capacity3 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

30. Fox’s Log Cabin Chicken Coop

I got to say, I always feel log cabins are aesthetically pleasing. I don’t know, maybe because I often see them in movies or photographs. If you have many logs and/or live in a log house, this plans might be a perfect choice. The gaps between logs can be a good ventilation, but you may have to wrap it in the winter.

Dimensions (feet)6 x 6
Ideal Capacity9 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

31. Minimal Cost Chicken Coop

Now imagine if you have more than 10 heavy breed chickens, and you need a coop for them. This would easily cost you over $1000 just to build the coop. Well, fortunately, there’s a way to build a beautiful large coop with just $600.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 5
Ideal Capacity10 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

32. Mammy’s 1895 Chicken House

This one got an interesting (hi)story behind it. Something something about the grandparents of Joy Tarter who owns a company in the US named Tarter Farm & Ranch. So, his grandparents built this chicken house in Kentucky, 1985. This chicken house is so durable, easy to maintain, easy to clean, and so comfortable for chickens that they decided to give away the plans so people can build it on their own.

Dimensions (feet)16 x 8
Ideal Capacity32 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

33. DIY Small Backyard Chicken Coop

This chicken coop — just like its name — is small and easy to set up. They even included 2-part videos explaining step by step on how to build it. The guy on this website said that it can hold up to 4 chickens, but I don’t recommend you to keep more than 2.

Dimensions (feet)3 x 2 for the shelter
Ideal Capacity2 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

34. Sunrise Chicks Chicken Coop

This chicken coop can hold up to 30 heavy breeds comfortably. But don’t be intimidated by the size, the guy who posted this plan didn’t have any experience before, it’s his first building project, yet he can build this big thing. It may look plain, but you’ll like this one if you’re not a “flashy” type of person.

Dimensions (feet)12 x 10
Ideal Capacity30 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

35. M101 Chicken Coop

If you love chickens (I mean really love chickens) then you’ll definitely want to consider a larger coop.

And if that is the case, then you’ll want to give this one a glance. The actual coop is off the ground for better predator protection. Plus, it has a large run as well.

Dimensions (feet)5 x 7 (indoor coop)
Ideal Capacity7 chickens
DifficultyHard

 

36. The Free and Easy Chicken Coop

Are you on a budget and have limited supplies or carpentry skills? Don’t fret. You can still have a fully functional chicken coop.

So you’ll only need 3 pallets, a few tools, and something that will work for a nesting box. Then your girls will be ready.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 4 (total)
Ideal Capacity4 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

37. The Self-Sustain Chicken Coop

This chicken coop is amazing. It has enough room for you to house a few backyard chickens, and it also looks simple enough to build.

But what sends this coop over the top is that it has a living roof. This means that you can grow food on the top of the coop to feed your chickens.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 3
Ideal Capacity3 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

38. The Stoop Coop

This coop is actually very brilliant. If you don’t have a lot of room to dedicate to your chickens (or their coop), then you might need to get creative.

Well, in this instance, the builder combined the chicken coop with a set of steps that they needed around their property.

Dimensions (feet)~8 sqft
Ideal Capacity2 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

39. The Mobile Stage Coach

This chicken coop is actually a chicken tractor. Meaning it is mobile and will allow your birds to be moved all over your property patrolling for bugs.

But if you aren’t feeling confident about building your own coop, then you might really like this option because you can actually order it precut. That will take a lot of the work of building out of the equation.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 3 (coop)
4 x 10 (total)
Ideal Capacity3 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

40. The Poop Coop

This coop is absolutely adorable. It is built to look just like an outhouse and adds a lot of character just from that alone.

But then you take a closer look at the coop and realize that the chicken door is actually a toilet seat lid. How cute and creative is that?

Dimensions (feet)4 x 3
Ideal Capacity3 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

41. The Picturesque Chicken Coop

This chicken coop looks almost picturesque in many ways. It has a great color scheme and really adds character to the yard where it sits.

But don’t let the beauty of the coop deter you if you are new to carpentry. This has a great tutorial with lots of pictures to help you along the way.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 6
Ideal Capacity6 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

42. Garden Shed Chicken Coop Plans

These plans are meant for a medium to the large chicken coop. This means if you plan on raising more than just a few hens, then this could be a good match.

Also, it is easy to get the plans as they are in PDF form, and you download them. Totally easy, right?

Dimensions (feet)8 x 8
Ideal Capacity16 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

43. The Crib Coop

If you have an old baby crib don’t throw it out. Instead cover the inside with chicken wire and apply a nice roof.

But don’t forget the opening for the birds and one for you to clean the coop out. The guess what? You have a very inexpensive and functional chicken coop.

Dimensions (feet)2.5 x 4
Ideal Capacity2 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

44. The Trampoline Chicken Coop

I’ve seen this before, but I always find it fascinating how people take items that they have quit using and make them into something that functions so well.

So you’ll have a great tutorial to help you along with this coop, but you basically build a small roosting area for your birds. Then the trampoline is enclosed and made into a good-sized run.

 

45. The Small and Friendly DIY Chicken Coop

This chicken coop is everything you need to raise a few backyard hens. It has a roosting area, a run, a nesting box, and steps for the hens to get in and out of the coop.

So if you are looking for something simple to build, then you might definitely want to consider this coop for your options.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 5
Ideal Capacity5 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

46. Another Ana White Coop

I’m a huge fan of Ana White. She makes all kinds of projects and always makes them seem so doable for us average folks.

But when I saw this coop, I knew it would be a good one to share. She always gives thorough instructions and materials lists to get you started.

Dimensions (feet)5 x 2.5
Ideal Capacity3 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

47. The Pallet Coop

You would probably never guess this sturdy coop was made from a bunch of pallets. But it was!

Plus, it has a great run, and it looks like a nice little chicken coop. It has a way of adding some flare to the property where it is sitting.

Dimensions (feet)5 x 5
Ideal Capacity6 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

48. Medium to Large Coop

If you are in the market for a chicken coop plans that’s not small but not too big, you’ve probably realized they are kind of difficult to come by. Everybody wants a smaller coop for a few hens or a large coop for a big farm.

But for those of us that raise around 20 birds, finding the right coops can be a challenge. These plans are made for more birds so hopefully you’ll like the way it looks.

Dimensions (feet)8 x 10
Ideal Capacity20 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

49. The Tongue and Groove Coop

This coop is a smaller coop that is meant to accommodate around 4 chickens. If you are only keeping a few hens for eggs for your family, then this coop would probably work great.

But it is a little pricey to build because it is built from tongue and groove cedar. However, the finished product looks to be worth every penny.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 5
Ideal Capacity5 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

 

50. The Custom Wood Chicken Coop

I really like the way this chicken coop looks. It seems very functional and clean in appearance.

But it is also a blank canvas. You can decorate it anyway you want so it can stand out or blend in as much as you desire for it too.

51. From Playhouse to Hen House

Do you have an old playhouse hanging around your house that you’ve never thrown away? Don’t do it now.

Instead, transform it (with this tutorial’s help) into the perfect hen house. That way you save money and give your girls a happy home.

Dimensions (feet)5 x 4
Ideal Capacity5 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

52. The Simple Coop That Works

This is more of an idea of what you can do to build a chicken coop. They took a small shed and transformed it into a smaller coop.

But it has everything your hens would need from roosting bars to nesting boxes. It also looks very inviting.

53. The Rustic/Whimsical Coop

This coop is so cool looking. It is a raised coop that is tucked neatly against the side of a house. The chickens free range as there is no attached run.

But you could always add one if desired. Other than that, they used a rustic tin roof and gave the hens a perfect country home.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 4
Ideal Capacity4 chickens
DifficultyEasy

 

54. The Well Protected Coop

This is another design that is meant more to inspire than to direct as they didn’t include plans. Yet, if you can build a small box with steps to it, then you can build the actual coop.

Then all you have to do is build a large enclosure and secure it with chicken wire and safe latches so no predators can get into your coop.

55. The Raised Wooden Pallet Coop

This coop is made from pallets so therefore it couldn’t be very expensive to build. It also is designed well so it appears it would function as most people would desire a coop to.

So if you are on a budget and need a functional coop, you might want to consider following this tutorial and building one similar to this.

56. The Palace Redone

There is a building plan for a palace chicken coop listed above. This palace is a little different though. They went above and beyond to make it a quaint design. So if you’d like to have a clean looking chicken coop with lots of character, then you might want to consider the way this chicken coop was finished.

57. Chicken Condo

This chicken condo is as cute as it can be. They break the build down for you so you can see how it is constructed as well. Hopefully, it’ll make the process a little easier. But this coop also has a run attached to it and a good number of nesting boxes as well. So if you are looking for a functional coop that will catch the eye, then this could be it.

58. Saltbox Coop

This chicken coop looks to be a manlier version of the chicken condo. It is made of solid wood and also has the upgrade of being able to collect eggs without entering the coop. But this coop also has a nice place on top so you can grow fresh herbs or lettuce for your birds as well.

59. Chicken Coop with Planter

This coop is a smaller version of the one mentioned above. It has been painted as well to add a little flare to the coop. But though it is a smaller coop, it still has room to grow fresh herbs and lettuce right on the roof of the coop.

60. The Small Modern Coop

This little coop is a bright addition to any yard. It would only hold a couple of hens, but it would fit well in many small backyards. Plus, it has the nice addition of being able to grow food right on top of your coop as well. So if you want something smaller but modern, this coop could be it.

61. Steadfast’s Chicken Coop Condo

If you have an old unused playhouse or swing set, you might want to consider transforming it into a chicken coop. Like how Steadfast did it with his now teenage daughter’s outgrown swing set. The indoor coop is 4×4 which technically can only house 4 chickens, but since the run area looks spacious you might be able to keep up to 7.

Dimensions (feet)4 x 4 (indoor coop)
Ideal Capacity7 chickens
DifficultyIntermediate

Source of the content and images: https://morningchores.com/chicken-coop-plans/

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