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“You can’t have too many clamps,” a wise cabinetmaker once said. This is certainly true, but in a small shop, you can easily run out of storage space. On clamp is so different from another that no single rack can house them all in one compact space. Most carpenters benefit from a variety of storage solutions. Here are seven board concepts to stimulate your creative thinking. Each design contains a great idea tailored to a specific type of clamp. Mix and match to fit your assortment and space. Make sure you leave room for more!

The duct fits all shorts

If you only have room for one rack for your short clamps, build this one. It houses a wide variety of shapes, almost anything that has jaws. The rack also contains C-clamps and quick release clamps, which usually need to be tightened to stay on a table for storage. Just hook them to the metal conduit. The duct is superior to using a wooden dowel rod because it is stiffer and more durable. For most clamps, place on the conduit 2 inches from the wall. Strategically locate a second length of conduit to support the long clamp bars.

Create big brackets

These sturdy 12 “x 16” brackets are perfect for storing many long, heavy clamps in a tight space. The 2 × 4 brackets are wide enough for pipe and bar clamps. Use 2×6 to store adjustable K-body style and deep groove clamps. Insert a 45 ° support board into each bracket. Screw the brackets to the cleats from the rear, leaving 2 ″ of space between the clamp bars. Then fix the brackets to the wall.

The metal brackets are for dual use

Do you have long pliers that you want to keep handy? Use heavy-duty 12 “shelf brackets. (They’re also great for lumber.) This rack works well for long, heavy clamps because it stores them horizontally, making them easy to remove, use, and return. When you need them, take it. Simply and lay it on your project. You will not have to twist or lift them as you would if you were storing long clamps in a vertical rack. Heavy Duty Shelf Brackets are available at home centers; standard slotted lengths are available in lengths for a dedicated clamping rack.

Throw them in a tub

Weird clamps won’t get lost if you keep them together in a serving tub, which costs around $ 3 at a discount store. Trays are a great way to store and transport spring clamps, C-clamps, and small hand screws. Trays with lids can also be stacked.

S.

attach them

Hands down, this is our favorite way to store hand screws. Simply saw angled nut into one edge of a 2 × 4. Cut the nut so that the sticks for hanging the clamps fit snugly. Glue and screw the sticks to the 2 × 4 and fasten the 2 × 4 to the wall. This rack also works great for hanging loads of spring clamps.

Add cleats

For regular pipes and adjustable clamps, storage doesn’t get much easier than that. Simply attach the 2 × 2 cleats behind a 2 × 4 and attach the cleats to the wall. The 11/2 ″ deep space provided by the cleats can accommodate most clamping heads. However, the long clamps will move away from a single rack and fall off. Install a second board at the bottom to keep them upright and stable. Clamps store compactly with this solution, but the more clamps you have, the more space you’ll use on the wall.

Cut notches

Without notches on a moving cart, a bump can make your clamps fly. The boards it nicks should be wide enough to fully support the heads of the clamps. The trick is to do enough so that the clamp bar is easy to insert and remove. To make half-round notches for hose clamps, drill holes in the center of a wide board. Cut out the center of the holes to create two support boards, each with half-round holes.


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