Collective Composition: A Historic Villa Renovation in Auckland by Katie Lockhart and Jack McKinney Architects

We have long admired the work of New Zealand interior designer Katie Lockhart, whose distinctive style crosses the boundaries between mid-century and contemporary while drawing inspiration from European, New Zealand and southern design. is Asian. Lockhart recently completed the renovation of a traditional New Zealand villa in Ponsonby, Auckland, in collaboration with Jack McKinney Architects for clients both working in creative fields which were inspired by a recent trip to Sri Lanka and the work of architect Geoffrey Bawa.

Working with a relatively small site bounded by houses on all sides, McKinney was limited by the heritage rules surrounding the original dwelling, a timber construction with a metal hipped roof typical of early New Zealand houses. Unable to change the exterior or roofline of the original house, McKinney suggested architectural expansion and renovation to only the non-original parts of the house. McKinney and Lockhart agreed on an identity for the architecture and interiors with integrity for both the old villa at the front and the new spaces facing the garden at the rear. “The result is a far cry from a typical Auckland villa modification, but feels natural and calm, not shrill and forced,” McKinney says.

Lockhart set out to showcase the sculptural nature of the space and support this vision, incorporating an interior garden, a palette inspired by Italian terracotta tiles and trowel-polished stained plaster walls, and rare designer items. from vintage dealers and his own travels.

Here is a walk in space.

Photograph by David Straight, courtesy of Katie Lockhart Studio.

The walls of the house are trowel-polished plaster by Resene Rockcote, shown here in Aalto Pause color.  The curtains are a cotton and linen blend, Ehbirra YP0 from Designs of the Time, running on a custom runway made by carpenter Grant Bailey.
Above: The walls of the house are trowel-polished plaster by Resene Rockcote, shown here in Aalto Pause color. The curtains are a cotton and linen blend, Ehbirra YP18016 from Designs of the Time, running on a custom runway made by carpenter Grant Bailey.
The living room furniture consists of the CS sofa from Truck Furniture in Osaka, Japan, a side chair made by Grant Bailey, both with custom olive green upholstery, as well as benches and tables from support for a sourcing trip to Japan.  The rug is a vintage Tuareg rug from Kulchi.  The lamp is the Hotaru Double Bubble Light by Barber & Osgerby for Ozeki & Co. Ltd., the Japanese manufacturers of Noguchi lampshades.
Above: Living room furniture consists of the CS sofa from Truck Furniture in Osaka, Japan, a side chair made by Grant Bailey, both with custom olive green upholstery, and benches and side tables of a sourcing trip to Japan. The rug is a vintage Tuareg rug from Kulchi. The lamp is the Hotaru Double Bubble Light by Barber & Osgerby for Ozeki & Co. Ltd., the Japanese manufacturers of Noguchi lampshades.
Lighting by means of an Aalto A8 floor lamp and a FLOS Jasper Morrison Glo-Ball table lamp.
Above: Lighting by means of an Aalto A810 floor lamp and a FLOS Jasper Morrison Glo-Ball table lamp.
McKinney came up with the idea of ​​installing custom walnut cabinetry along the length of the wall, connecting the living space with the kitchen beyond.
Above: McKinney came up with the idea of ​​installing custom walnut cabinetry along the length of the wall, connecting the living space with the kitchen beyond.
A wider view of the living room and the open kitchen.  Without a kitchen island, note the architects, the dining table becomes a central gathering space, connecting the two rooms into one.
Above: a wider view of the living room and open kitchen. Without a kitchen island, note the architects, the dining table becomes a central gathering space, connecting the two rooms into one.

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