Twin Gables: A Mid-century Eichler House in Silicon Valley Gets a Minimalist Update

When Isabelle Olson and Matthaeus Krenn visited the mid-century twin-gabled house in Sunnyvale, designed by A. Quincy Jones and Frederick Emmons in 1962 for Eichler, they knew they had found a piece of jewelry. The only problem was that he had gone through several unfortunate renovations, the total amount of which was exceeded and off-putting.

“One of the main goals of the renovation was to peel off the many layers of renovations that had occurred in previous decades, which meant removing the long pile carpet, mirrored walls and old cupboards to make room to a more refined palette of materials, ”explains San The architect of Francisco Ryan Leidner, who was brought on board to sensibly reinvent the house for the couple, the two designers who work in technology, and their two young children.

Ryan crossed the border between restoration (preserving the footprint, freshening the wooden ceiling) and renovation (tearing down a wall for an open concept kitchen and living room) with balance and restraint. Let’s see the results.

Photograph by Joe Fletcher, courtesy of Ryan Leidner Architecture.

The exterior of the house, originally called plan OJ-05. & # 8
Above: The exterior of the house, originally called plan OJ-1605. “The front panel was covered with strips of red cedar that were cut to alternate depths to create a vertical pattern that echoes the original grooved plywood covering while concealing a flush garage door,” says Ryan.
The front door leads to this interior courtyard, around which the house is built. The landscape design is carried out by Stephens Design Studio.
Above: The front door leads to this interior courtyard, around which the house is built. The landscape design is carried out by Stephens Design Studio.
Eichler houses are known for their priority in indoor and outdoor living. The living room has a view (and access) of the courtyard and the swimming pool on the other side. Almost all rooms have access to the outside.
Above: Eichler homes are known for their priority in indoor and outdoor living. The living room has a view (and access) of the courtyard and the swimming pool on the other side. Almost all rooms have access to the outside.
& # 8
Above: “Wanting to celebrate the logic of the house’s existing structural system of columns and beams, the walls have been strategically removed to create more opening in the floor plan, while a large set of glass doors sliding stacking has been added to the rear facade, the interior space to flow seamlessly to the backyard and the new swimming pool.
The elegant kitchen in Carrara marble and painted wood cabinets with white oak accents. The tongue-and-groove wooden walls and ceilings have all been painted white to ensure cohesion.
Above: the elegant kitchen with Carrara marble cabinets and painted wood with white oak accents. The tongue-and-groove wooden walls and ceilings have all been painted white to ensure cohesion.
Thonet chairs surround a round table by Maruni. & # 8
Above: Thonet chairs surround a round table by Maruni. “A large porcelain tile was chosen for the flooring throughout the house, which allowed the consistency of the materials in the interior spaces outside,” says Ryan.
The master bedroom, with access to the pool and patio.
Above: The master bedroom, with access to the pool and patio.
The master bedroom includes the Spoon spoon and a wall-mounted sink, both from Agape. An Eames cork stool adds a little natural warmth to the white bathroom.
Above: The master bedroom includes the Spoon spoon and a wall-mounted sink, both from Agape. An Eames cork stool adds a little natural warmth to the white bathroom.
A bathroom with a view. The lights are from Dornbracht.
Above: A bathroom with a view. The lights are from Dornbracht.
The cheerful bedroom of one of the couples & # 8
Above: The cheerful bedroom of one of the couple’s two children overlooks the courtyard.
A room facing outwards.
Above: an outward-facing bedroom.
The landscaping was deliberately designed to have a more organic and loose style as a counterweight to the minimalism of the interiors.
Above: The landscaping was deliberately designed to have a more organic and loose style as a counterweight to the minimalism of the interiors.
Indoors and outdoors, perfectly blurred.
Above: inside and out, perfectly blurred.

For more Ryan Leidner projects, see:

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